Mindfulness While Doing Your Job: My Experiment

Mindfulness While Doing Your Job: My Experiment

Everybody knows the benefits of mindfulness meditation.

From improved concentration, to even the ability to age slowly to restoration of peace of mind. And we can take this into the workplace, so we can be more productive with our tasks and be more happier in what we are doing.

What I’m saying is that being mindful has numerous benefits and if you can take this into the workplace, a place when you can get stressed very easily, your chances of panic attack recovery increases dramatically.

Even in a workplace where you find the workload dull and boring, mindfulness can be a great way in keeping yourself from being distracted, and therefore stopping mistakes by distraction from creeping in.

By stopping yourself from being distracted, you are consistently producing a higher quality of work, which should keep you in favor of your job and should, thanks to the decreased effects of the Amygdala, keep you as stress free as possible.

You see, I was going to write an article about mindfulness while actually doing your job. But then I decided against it for numerous reasons.

The Dilemma

When you are mindful, you are essentially in the, ‘hear and now’.

That’s fine, and we all need it to keep our stress levels at bay, stop panic attacks from flaring up, and ultimately have good peace of mind. The problem is in trying to be mindful enough to being present, yet still, ‘think’ as part of our job.

This was the dilemma I faced fairly recently. Being mindful while being at the work place… how can you be mindful, yet think in order to do your job?

Do you try to be present in between the small jobs you are doing, i.e. every small minute you have of free time?

This could seem slightly arduous, that only a very strong disciplined mind can achieve. We need to find something a bit more practical and more realistic to obtain; something that you can get into a habit of…that is to say, practicing it until you can do it without giving it a thought.

So instead of writing about mindfulness in the workplace, I’m going to do a 7 day experiment.

Starting from today, I’m going to incorporate a certain technique into my day-to-day running of things, and see how it will affect my way of thinking, my general focus, and ultimately my beliefs (I’m thinking that if I’m, ‘present’ as much as possible, surely this may indirectly affect what I believe in).

The Technique

In order for me to pull this off, I’m going to have to employ a famous mindfulness technique which is one that can be done using the tiniest of thinking power: Breathing.

I’m going to focus on my breathing, while trying to think about the task I am trying to achieve.

I have already done an earlier test on this, and found the results quite surprising; I found that although I could still think, I couldn’t daydream as easily as I could (I used to be a heavy fantasizer in days gone by).

And while my thoughts were quite clear, I found that I felt more at peace than when I was thinking fully.

The Drawback

Of course with any experiment, there will be some problems.

The first one I anticipate is the fantasying. I am big into day dreaming. I know it isn’t productive (i.e. it doesn’t help with achieving your goals, unless you focus that daydreaming into visualization) but I do fantasize quite a bit while doing my chores. So I don’t expect myself to be focused on my breath as much as I would like to.

Also, this is also sleep dependent. Having insomnia means that unless you have a great nights sleep, experiments like these are usually meaningless.

That is, unless you feel generally refreshed to begin with, people with attentional problems (like myself) find it hard to concentrate alone, not alone be mindful.

I’m hoping that if I can keep being focused on my breath slightly, my thoughts (although slow) will be more focused so I can still achieve my goals in the quickest time possible, while retaining the internal willpower and inner peace of mind that we expect mindfulness to achieve.

Keep in tune for the results next week;-)